Ramblings: National Education Summit 2019 Brisbane

National Education Summit – 2019 Brisbane

On the 31 of May and the 1 of June 2019, I was fortunate enough to attend the 2019 National Education Summit in Brisbane and the 2 day Capacity Building School Libraries conference. Thanks to my employer and leadership team for encouraging and funding my attendance. What a two days it was. So much knowledge and experience, so much to be inspired about. If you were unable to attend, read on for a quick summery of the speakers and the info shared. And if you are interested in future events, sign up to stay updated on the National Education Summit website.

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Ramblings: Genrefication – one year on

Library Ramblings: Genrefication – one year on

A year ago, our school library transformed our Young Adult collection. Using a variety of new genre stickers, genre groupings and collection changes, we fully embraced the genrefication process for our fiction collection. One year on, I took the time to investigate how the change effected our library, borrowing statistics, usage of the collection and student feedback, and how this reflection would direct our future practice. Here is what I learnt, my successes, what I could have done better and my thoughts on the overall process.

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Ramblings: Holiday Borrowing

Library Ramblings: Holiday Borrowing

Poster created thanks to photo by Clem Onojeghuo from Pexels.

This is a topic I see pop up in school librarian discussions every time summer stars to roll around. To lend or not to lend? That is a question many librarians wrestle with. The long summer holiday period offers both a wonderful time for relaxed, lengthy reading, but also threatens lost and damaged books as families travel, move house or spend long days at the beach. So, do the rewards outweigh the risk?

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Ramblings: Genrefication

Genrefication of a library fiction collection

Genrefication is perhaps the new (and yet not that new at all, really) buzzword for libraries. Opinions are divided on the benefit of such a move, and whether this step should apply to fiction or non-fiction collections (Pendergrass, 2013). Library consultants such as Kevin Hennah (Hennah, n.d) advocate for this book-shop model. Others cite the benefits, which range from better data collection on circulation and a visual aid for collection development to increased user engagement with the collection (Sweeney, 2013).

Genrefication actually isn’t that new (Shearer, 1996), but research surrounding its use and impact on readers is now increasing (Moyer, 2005). Moyer’s review of literature surrounding readers’ services found that genrefication can improve circulation, reader satisfaction, and ease of library navigation. However, other researchers found that genrefication may not be needed as technological advancements and provisions of OPACs allow library users to browse and search by genre digitally (Moyer, 2005). More research is needed on this area, and as individual libraries make the move to present their collection by genres more data can be gathered and shared about its benefits and limitations.

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