Book Week 2017: Activity Ideas

Book Week 2017 – Activity Ideas

Book Week is such an exciting time for celebrating books, libraries and readers. Here are a few ideas for Book Week activities, fitting in with this year’s theme Escape To Everywhere.

Escape Room

Have you ever been locked in a room with a group of people and given clues to help you escape? Sounds fun. LibraryLady Nicole has provided a detailed manual for an escape room, which she used in her own library. Her Escape Room Manual, provided in PDF form, is seriously epic, so look no further if you are interested in creating your own escape room.

Escape From the Library Game

mr-lemoncelloBased on Chris Grabenstein’s book Escape From Mr. Lemoncello’s Library this library Scavenger Hunt has been created by several librarians and Chris Grabenstein himself. lemoncello-spinner-300Access the instructions from Chris Grabenstein’s website.

narnia-posterTravel Posters

Design a travel poster to your favourite fictional escape. These beautiful examples listed on Buzz Feed will provide some inspiration.

Postcards from Far Away

the-day-the-crayons-came-homeJust like the crayons in The Day The Crayons Came Home written by Drew Daywalt and illustrated by Oliver Jeffers, write a postcard from your favourite getaway destination.

Escape Reality Poster Competition

escape reality

What is your ideal escape? Take a photo and edit in your escape. Photoshop skills required. I’m still working out the details for this comp, but I’m sure our senior students will love to have a play with this. Perhaps something we could do with the teachers????

Book Week 2017: Theme Announcement

Book Week 2017

The theme for Book Week 2017 has been announced – Escape to Everywhere

escape

Book Week 2017 will run from the 18 -25 of August 2017.

escape

Some Book Week themes offer so much potential and Escape to Everywhere is certainly one of those. We all know books offer the perfect escape. Want to travel the world, fight dragons, time travel, fall in love, or survive school? Well, look no further than your nearest bookshelf. But libraries offer an escape also, a place to relax, learn, discover, experiment and create…the options are endless.

The release of the Book Week theme artwork always helps direct the use of the theme, but I wanted to start throwing around ideas. So, here is my brainstorm results so far. Add your own ideas in the comments below.

escape-word-cloud

Meanwhile, you can check out my Pinterest board, Library – Book Week, which I will be updating to reflect the 2017 theme.

Book Week 2016: Rainbow Serpent

Book Week 2016 – Rainbow Serpent

Serpent 2

Inspired by Indigenous storytelling and Shaun Tan’s artwork for this year’s Book Week, I have created a large Rainbow Serpent to brighten up the entrance to the junior reading room.

Serpent 1

I used 12 pieces of A3 cardboard joined together to make the serpent. I used Outback as the font to create the words on the serpent, which I downloaded from dafont. I simply printed the words I wanted and traced them onto the serpent.

The colouring was completed by my fabulous student helpers – anyone who was free during lunch breaks or after school and didn’t mind indulging in some relaxing colouring. I find the students love helping to create displays (especially when it involves colouring in) and it increases their connection to the finished display.


Book Week 2016: Literary Signpost

Book Week 2016: Costume Ideas

Book Week 2016: Activities

Book Week 2016: Activities #2

Book Week 2016: Short list display

Book Week 2016 – Short list display

 These are my displays promoting the Book of the Year Notables and Short list.

Notables

Notables

Short Listphoto%202-1

photo%201-1Inspired by Shaun Tan’s artwork this year, I have used red, orange and yellow as my main theme colours. I used Outback as the font, which I downloaded from dafont. Yellow and orange crepe paper in a simple twist pattern create a quick and easy border.

Both the Notables list and Short list can be found on the CBCA website.


Book Week 2016: Literary Signpost

Book Week 2016: Costume Ideas

Book Week 2016: Activities

Book Week 2016: Activities #2

Activity: Library Olympic Games

Library Olympic Games – Library Activities

Olympic Book Rings

This is the second part in my Library Olympics prep – my display ideas can be found under Display: Olympic Games.

This library challenge is designed  so that students can engage in a competitive but inclusive challenge to inspire them to read more, read with their friends and use books to help them complete fun tasks.

Students can complete any or all tasks individually or in teams. They will earn points for their class group or school house team.

World FlagsChallenge 1: Flag design

Design your own flag. It can be a personal flag or make a team and share the design. We will display the flags with the other countries’ flags bunting, from Mr Printables.

Challenge 2: Paper plane making and flying competition

Create the most aerodynamic or the most fantastic looking paper plane. Create a paper plane that can fly the highest or do the most loops. We will test the planes during lunchtime outside the front of the library.

Challenge 3: Origami making

Using the library’s origami books, create an origami piece to add to our display. Can you create one that is sports themed?

Olympics PictogramsChallenge 4: Pictogram design

Design a new set of Olympic Pictograms for reading in a variety of exciting ways. Reading while lying on the beach, reading while surfing, or maybe reading while riding a horse???

Challenge 5: Reading Challenge

This event is based on the Olympic Reading Challenge found on Mrs Mac’s Library. 

Artistic Gymnastics: Read 3 Picture Books

100m Sprint: Read a short story (or book from the Easy Reads collection)

Marathon: Read for 30mins straight

Triathlon: Read 3 books by 3 different authors

Weightlifiting: Read a book of more than 200 pages

Relay: You and a friend read the same book.

Equestrian: Read a book about animals, fiction or non-fiction.

Book Week 2016: Activity Ideas #2

Book Week 2016 – Activity Ideas, Vol. 2

Australia - Story Country

Looking for fun ways to engage readers this Book Week? Here are a few more activity ideas, both my own and adaptions from others’, for this year’s Book Week. Also, check out my post Book Week 2016 – Activities Ideas post.

Guessing Competitions

Book in a jarBook in a jar: This is already a wildly popular guessing competition. Give it a Book Week 2016 twist by choosing an Aussie title to shred (or cut into squares).

Who Am I?: I was born in 1974 in Bendigo, Victoria. Before becoming an author I was  an actor, university lecturer and artist. I write and illustrate books for children. This year, my book is nominated for Book of the Year: Early Childhood. Who am I?

The name you know me by is actually a pseudonym, a fake name to conceal my identity. I grew up in Sydney. I have written over 50 books for children. This year, my novel has been shortlisted for Book of the Year: Younger Readers. Who am I?

This guessing competition might also need a few author information posters displayed nearby or perhaps hidden around the library, or students can use their devices or the books’ author pages to find details to help them solve the clues.

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Book Week 2016: Activity Ideas

Book Week 2016 – Activity Ideas

Australia - Story Country

Book Week is a fantastic time for promoting libraries and engaging readers in a variety of activities to increase their connection with reading, Australian literature and library services. Here are just a few activity ideas, both my own and adaptions from others’, for this year’s Book Week.

Storytelling

Guest storyteller: Many libraries are fortunate to be able to afford a special guest visitor or author during the Book Week celebrations. This year storytellers, performers and Indigenous storytellers are sure to be popular. But if the budget doesn’t stretch to such an event, perhaps look within the library or school community. I’m sure someone within that population sticks out as a person who is good at spinning a yarn or has a knack for making a story spring to life. And if you still can’t find a willing victim, perhaps try an online video or retelling.

Rory's Story CubesGroup storytelling: Story cards and dice, such as Rory’s Story Cubes, are excellent for promoting storytelling with a group. While any story cards or flip chart would work I particularly like the Story Cubes (no, I’m not being paid to write this), as they are so tactile and pretty. But a cube net that students can create and design their own set of cubes would also work.

Giant Board Games

YA-Reading-Bingo-Challenge-2014Bingo: I’ve promoted this Reading Bingo from Random House before, but I think it would make an excellent giant bingo game. Create a giant board by enlarging each square and laminating. You would also need smaller copy to cut up and place in a container from which to randomly draw each square. As a square is drawn players have to name a title that fits, e.g. A Book That Became A Movie – The Hobbit. Write the book title on the square on the giant board (use a whiteboard marker so that it can be erased to play multiple times). This could be played competitively, with the names of students also listed on the squares, in teams or simply to see how quickly a group can fill the whole grid or one line.

Giant ScrabbleScrabble or Bananagrams: Check out this post from Constantly Lovestruck about a giant game of bananagrams, with a list of how many tiles you will need of each letter.

Pacman Pac-Man: This librarian created a giant Pac-Man board on the floor of her library. Details can be found on the blog Tvahlsing. 

Guess Who: I have seen giant Guess Who games and DIY Guess Who games using everyone from Bible characters to US Presidents. I would make a giant Guess Who game using book characters. You could use animated characters from popular titles such as Diary of a Wimpy Kid  or instead use the actors that have become the iconic representations of book characters.

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Book Week 2016: Display Ideas

Book Week 2016 – Display Ideas

The theme for Book Week 2016, Australia: Story Country, offers plenty of great ways to celebrate and decorate!!! Here are some of the ways I hope to decorate the library for this year’s Book Week.

Australia - Story Country

Short List

Molly-and-Pim-MurrayEvery year the library displays the books on the Book of the Year Short list, which you can find on the CBCA website.   piranhas-don-t-eat-bananasThis year a backdrop of hessian and Aussie road signs will decorate this display and give it an Aussie touch.

Under the Shade of A Coolibah Tree

Coolibah TreeI plan to update the Reading Tree to a Coolibah Tree, like the one mentioned in Waltzing Matilda, changing the leaves to gumtree-shaped leaves. Reading Tree - Green

With a few neutral coloured pieces of fabric, the bench seats will feel a little more outback-like and a fake campfire in the centre of the area will create a great space to gather for storytelling. Hanging stars will give the area an-outdoor, storytelling under the stars feel.

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Book Week 2016: Costume Ideas

Book Week 2016 – Costumes

If you like to match your Book Week costume to the theme, represent a literary character or maybe try to do both then the 2016 theme gives you plenty of room to move. Australia: Story Country is a theme that lets one explore all the wonders of Australian fiction, storytelling, writing, history, culture and pretty much anything else you want. Here are some of my ideas for costumes that fit with the 2016 Book Week theme.  Continue reading

Book Week 2016: Aussie Literary Signpost

Book Week 2016 – Australian Themed Literary Signpost
Literary Signpost

Street Signs

This Book Week 2016 I wanted to honour the theme, Australia: Story Country, by updating our literary signpost. Australia has some iconic place names, some of which have starred in Australian literature.


Binnum SignpostI have added these to the literary signpost to give it a fresh look and tie it in with the Australian theme.